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Technology

SOHO is an acronym for "Small Office/Home Office", a common platform for software development. see also- SOHOdb, an open source business database


Culture

Wikinfo was inspired by Fred Bauder in 2003, based on Wikipedia, but differed in that articles were to be written from a "Sympathetic Point of View" (SPOV). From January, 2004 to March, 2007, it ran and helped fuel development of the GetWiki collaboration software. Once again using Wikipedian software to power the site, the XML-based importing of Wikipedia content has...


Licensing

Version 1.2, November 2002 Copyright (C) 2000,2001,2002 Free Software Foundation, Inc. 59 Temple Place, Suite 330, Boston, MA 02111-1307 USA Everyone is permitted to copy and distribute verbatim copies of this license document, but changing it is not allowed. 0. PREAMBLE - The purpose of this License is to make a manual, textbook, or other functional and useful document "free" in the...


Culture

PseudoPhilosophy is any idea or system that masquerades itself as Philosophy while significantly failing to meet some suitable intellectual standards. The term is frequently pejorative, and most applications of it are quite contentious. The term bears the same relationship to Philosophy that PseudoScience bears to Science, or Anti-Matter to Matter. The term is often...


Philosophical Studies

Philosophy of Mathematics is an active branch of Philosophy addressing questions about the character of Mathematics, the conduct of mathematical inquiry, and the role of mathematical objects in describing empirical phenomena. As a form of philosophical inquiry, it examines the record of mathematical inquiry and poses...


Biographies

John Locke (29 Aug 1632 - 28 Oct 1704) was an English physician and philosopher and a key Enlightenment influence. After Francis Bacon and Thomas Hobbes, Locke developed Empiricism as a strong response to Cartesian Dualism and Rationalism, and a new Contract Theory in response to the...


Software

The Apache HTTP Server is an open source HTTP web server for Unix platforms (BSDi, Linux, and Mac OS X systems), Microsoft Windows, and other platforms. The author claims the name was initially chosen as a catchy name in order to be original, but the most widespread interpretation (which almost immediately surfaced) is that the name comes from the fact that...


Biographies

Max Weber (21 Apr 1864 - 14 Jun 1920) was a German thinker who developed a "Hermeneutic" tradition in Sociology and Economics. Weber based many of his economic studies on early twentieth-century Germany, and became well-known for his study of the "bureaucratization" of society. Life and Works - Born in Erfurt, Germany, and the eldest of seven children of Max Weber and Helene, young...


Biographies

Charles Sanders Peirce (10 Sep 1839 - 19 Apr 1914, and pronounced: "Purse") was an American philosopher, logician, mathematician, and developer of Semiotics, for which he is largely appreciated today. Peirce considered himself a logician first and foremost, and made major contributions to the development of Formal Logic still read in studies of...


Books

Dynamism (see Dynamism for encyclopedic information) is a series of treatises in Philosophy by M.R.M. Parrott, addressing subjects from Science, to Religion, and everything in between, such as a Theory of Life, Subjectivity, Ethics, and more. Volume I: Force (Web)Quantum Physics and...


GetWiki

XHTML Symbols - Below is a quick reference for Logic and Mathematics symbols in XHTML which work on all modern browsers These are intended for logical and mathematical articles, or any page requiring special characters not found in the "edit bar" Feel free to copy-and-paste (ctrl/cmd-c, ctrl/cmd-v) symbols Logic: ¬ ∧ ∨ ∃...


Software

PHP (PHP:Hypertext Preprocessor) is a reflective programming language originally designed for producing dynamic web pagesweblink | work PHP Manual| title = Introduction | accessdate - 2006-11-15 PHP is used mainly in server-side scripting, but can be used from a command line interface or in...


Biographies

Baruch Benedict de Spinoza (24 Nov 1632 - 21 Feb 1677) was a Dutch philosopher of a Portuguese Jewish family, whose controversial metaphysical ideas led to cherem (removal) against him from Jewish Society, and his works were banned by the Vatican. Despite his considerable scientific aptitude, the breadth and importance of Spinoza's work was...


Philosophical Studies

Semiosis is any form of activity, conduct, or process that involves signs, including the production of meaning. The term was introduced by Charles Sanders Peirce (1839?1914) to describe a process that interprets signs as referring to their objects, as described in his theory of sign relations, or semiotics. Other theories...


Truth Theory

A truth theory or a theory of truth is a conceptual framework that underlies a particular conception of truth, such as those used in art, ethics, logic, mathematics, philosophy, the sciences, or any discussion that either mentions or makes use of a notion of truth. A truth theory can be anything from a casual theory, based on implicit, informal, and vaguely...


Biographies

Thomas Hobbes (5 Apr 1588 - 4 Dec 1679) was an English political philosopher, most famous for his book Leviathan (1651), and his view of a "state of nature" to avoid, a life "brutish, nasty and short". His view of the necessity of a powerful central Government, where some may be stronger or more intelligent than others, but none are beyond fear of another doing harm to them. ...


GetWiki

GetWiki Endures 20 August, 2014 - Over the past five years, GetWiki.net has enjoyed a period of small improvements to the GetWiki:2.0 software, kindly hosted by ibiblio, and subtle updates to its content, focused primarily on Philosophy. From the perspective of distance, it seems most of us who were involved in early developments of the WikiSphere have gone on...


GetWiki

Know of any goings-on in the meta-worlds of philosophy to software, logical standards to internet standards, metaphysics to metadata?? Post them here (in the forums)! ''older water cooler bottles: 1-2 and see Forum:Importing Wiki|notes on importing...


Software

Introducing GetWiki 1.0 - Despite the wonderful aspects of what the software could do, had many nagging problems, along with many hidden defaults which may not serve other sites beyond Pseudopedia's reach. After a series of bugfixes to Mediawiki 1.1.0, it became apparent the Internet-Encyclopedia software...


Culture

is wikinfo dead?- Wow, Fred has made some radical changes very quickly over there! Besides his unethical, unwarranted freak out on me (Proteus, the one person who kept Wikinfo running smoothly for 3 years), he totally botched a questionable regrade back to MediaWiki (thus solidifying his ties to Jimbo's Borg, and killing the importing which made Wikinfo what it was). By making all the...


History of Philosophy

Eastern Philosophy is a diverse body of approaches to life and philosophizing, particularly centered on understanding the process of the Universe and the endless "becoming". In Western culture, the term Eastern Philosophy refers very broadly to the various...


Philosophy

Ontology is the most fundamental branch of Metaphysics, the study of Being and Existence, as well as the basic Categories of things in general. A Being is anything that can be said to 'be' in various senses of the word 'be'. The verb "to be"...


GetWiki

Positive Point of View (PPOV) is used on GetWiki's information/encyclopedic "primer" pages to present a subject or concept from a the perspective of a proponent, a favourable, affirmative light, but also equally encourages critical perspectives to be presented. Criticism of that same subject or concept can be placed in sections within the same ariticle, or on a separate, well-linked...


Culture

How many students have relied on false information from Wikipedia? Is the fact that it's a Wiki relevant to the question? "Pseudopedia", "The Wikipedia", is an open-content information website, whose co-founder claims is the "sum of all human knowledge", or at least, that it should become that sum. Since 2003, The...

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