SUPPORT THE WORK

GetWiki

Naturalism (theatre)

ARTICLE SUBJECTS
aesthetics  →
being  →
complexity  →
database  →
enterprise  →
ethics  →
fiction  →
history  →
internet  →
knowledge  →
language  →
licensing  →
linux  →
logic  →
method  →
news  →
perception  →
philosophy  →
policy  →
purpose  →
religion  →
science  →
sociology  →
software  →
truth  →
unix  →
wiki  →
ARTICLE TYPES
essay  →
feed  →
help  →
system  →
wiki  →
ARTICLE ORIGINS
critical  →
discussion  →
forked  →
imported  →
original  →
Naturalism (theatre)
[ temporary import ]
please note:
- the content below is remote from Wikipedia
- it has been imported raw for GetWiki
File:MissJulie1906.jpg|thumb|right|300px|Photograph of the first production in Stockholm of August Strindberg's 1888 naturalistic play Miss JulieMiss JulieNaturalism is a movement in European drama and theatre that developed in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. It refers to theatre that attempts to create an illusion of reality through a range of dramatic and theatrical strategies. Interest in naturalism especially flourished with the French playwrights of the time, but the most successful example is Strindberg’s play Miss Julie{{Citation needed|date=February 2017}}, which was written with the intention to abide by both his own particular version of naturalism, and also the version described by the French novelist and literary theoretician, Émile Zola.Madsen, Borge Gedso. Strindberg’s Naturalistic Theatre. Russell & Russell.1962. {{ISBN|0-8462-1729-5}}Zola’s term for naturalism is la nouvelle formule. The three primary principles of naturalism (faire vrai, faire grand and faire simple) are first, that the play should be realistic, and the result of a careful study of human behaviour and psychology. The characters should be flesh and blood; their motivations and actions should be grounded in their heredity and environment. The presentation of a naturalistic play, in terms of the setting and performances, should be realistic and not flamboyant or theatrical. The single setting of Miss Julie, for example, is a kitchen. Second, the conflicts in the play should be issues of meaningful, life-altering significance — not small or petty. And third, the play should be simple — not cluttered with complicated sub-plots or lengthy expositions.Madsen, Borge Gedso. Strindberg’s Naturalistic Theatre. Russell & Russell.1962. {{ISBN|0-8462-1729-5}}Darwinian understandings pervade naturalistic plays, especially in the determining role of the environment on character, and as motivation for behavior. Naturalism emphasizes everyday speech forms, plausibility in the writing, (no ghosts, spirits or gods intervening in the human action), a choice of subjects that are contemporary and reasonable (no exotic, otherworldly or fantastic locales, nor historical or mythic time-periods); an extension of the social range of characters portrayed (not only the aristocrats of classical drama, to include bourgeois and working-class protagonists) and social conflicts; and a style of acting that attempts to recreate the impression of reality.Naturalism was first advocated explicitly by Émile Zola in his 1880 essay entitled Naturalism on the Stage.

Influences

Naturalistic writers were influenced by the theory of evolution of Charles Darwin.Williams (1976, 217). They believed that one's heredity and social environment determine one's character. Whereas realism seeks only to describe subjects as they really are, naturalism also attempts to determine "scientifically" the underlying forces (i.e. the environment or heredity) influencing the actions of its subjects. Naturalistic works are opposed to romanticism, in which subjects may receive highly symbolic, idealistic, or even supernatural treatment. They often include uncouth or sordid subject matter; for example, Émile Zola's works had a frankness about sexuality along with a pervasive pessimism. Naturalistic works exposed the dark harshness of life, including poverty, racism, sex, prejudice, disease, prostitution, and filth. As a result, Naturalistic writers were frequently criticized for being too blunt.{{Citation needed|date=April 2015}}

Plays of naturalism

See also

Notes

{{reflist}}

Further reading

  • Banham, Martin, ed. 1998. The Cambridge Guide to Theatre. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. {{ISBN|0-521-43437-8}}.
  • Counsell, Colin. 1996. Signs of Performance: An Introduction to Twentieth-Century Theatre. London and New York: Routledge. {{ISBN|0-415-10643-5}}.
  • Hagen, Uta. 1973. Respect for Acting. New York: Macmillan. {{ISBN|0-02-547390-5}}.
  • Hall, Peter. 2004. Shakespeare's Advice to the Players. London: Oberon. {{ISBN|1-84002-411-9}}.
  • Kolocotroni, Vassiliki, Jane Goldman and Olga Taxidou, eds. 1998. Modernism: An Anthology of Sources and Documents. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press. {{ISBN|0-7486-0973-3}}.
  • Rodenberg, Patsy. 2002. Speaking Shakespeare. London: Methuen. {{ISBN|0-413-70040-2}}.
  • Stanislavski, Konstantin. 1936. An Actor Prepares. London: Methuen, 1988. {{ISBN|0-413-46190-4}}.
  • Weimann, Robert. 1978. Shakespeare and the Popular Tradition in the Theater: Studies in the Social Dimension of Dramatic Form and Function. Baltimore and London: The Johns Hopkins University Press. {{ISBN|0-8018-3506-2}}.
  • Williams, Raymond. 1976. Keywords: A Vocabulary of Culture and Society. London: Fontana, 1988. {{ISBN|0-00-686150-4}}.
  • ---. 1989. The Politics of Modernism: Against the New Conformists. Ed. Tony Pinkney. London and New York: Verso. {{ISBN|0-86091-955-2}}.
  • ---. 1993. Drama from Ibsen to Brecht. London: Hogarth. {{ISBN|0-7012-0793-0}}.
{{Modern drama}}

- content above as imported from Wikipedia
- "Naturalism (theatre)" does not exist on GetWiki (yet)
- time: 5:19am EST - Sun, Feb 17 2019
[ this remote article is provided by Wikipedia ]
LATEST EDITS [ see all ]
GETWIKI 09 MAY 2016
GETWIKI 18 OCT 2015
M.R.M. Parrott
Biographies
GETWIKI 20 AUG 2014
GETWIKI 19 AUG 2014
GETWIKI 18 AUG 2014
Wikinfo
Culture
CONNECT