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Diocesan bishop

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Diocesan bishop
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A diocesan bishop, within various Christian traditions, is a bishop or archbishop in pastoral charge of a diocese or archdiocese. In relation to other bishops, a diocesan bishop may be a suffragan, a metropolitan (if an archbishop) or a primate. They may also hold various other positions such as being a cardinal or patriarch.Titular bishops in the Roman Catholic Church may be assistant bishops with special faculties, coadjutor bishops (these bishops are now named as coadjutors of the dioceses they will lead, and not as titular bishops), auxiliary bishops, nuncios or similar papal diplomats (usually archbishops), officials of the Roman Curia (usually for bishops as heads or deputies of departments who are not previous ordinaries), etc. They may also hold other positions such as cardinal. The see of titular bishop is only nominal, not pastoral- meaning he does not exercise final authority as the head bishop (the ordinary), or have the right to automatically succeed the aforementioned individual (the coadjutor), over an existing diocese or archdiocese or their Eastern rite equivalents, (arch-)eparchies. Titular bishops may be active or retired. Occasionally, as a priest, they may have been given a titular bishopric or archbishopric as an honor by the Pope, similar to when he names some cardinals.Code of Canon Law (1983), canon 376. Quote=Bishops to whom the care of some diocese is entrusted are called diocesan; others are called titular {{webarchive |url=https://web.archive.org/web/20080219141242weblink |date=February 19, 2008 }}

Roman Catholic Church

{{Catholic Church Hierarchy}}
See also: {{sectionlink|Catholic Church hierarchy|Diocesan bishops}} and {{slink|Bishop (Catholic Church)|Diocesan bishops or eparchs}}
A "diocesan bishop" WEB, Canon 376,weblink Libreria Editrice Vaticana, 1983 Canon law (Catholic Church), Code of Canon Law, 27 July 2009, dead,weblink" title="web.archive.org/web/20080219141242weblink">weblink 19 February 2008, — in the Catholic Church — is entrusted with the pastoral care of a local Church (diocese), over which he holds ordinary jurisdiction.WEB, Canon 369,weblink Libreria Editrice Vaticana, 1983 Canon law (Catholic Church), Code of Canon Law, 27 July 2009, dead,weblink" title="web.archive.org/web/20080219141242weblink">weblink 19 February 2008, He is responsible for teaching, governing, and sanctifying the faithful of his diocese, sharing these duties with the priests and deacons who serve under him.WEB, Canon 381,weblink Libreria Editrice Vaticana, 1983 Canon law (Catholic Church), Code of Canon Law, 27 July 2009, dead,weblink" title="web.archive.org/web/20080219141242weblink">weblink 19 February 2008,

Coadjutor bishop

The Holy See can appoint a coadjutor bishopWEB, Canon 403 §3,weblink Libreria Editrice Vaticana, 1983 Canon law (Catholic Church), Code of Canon Law, 27 July 2009, dead,weblink" title="web.archive.org/web/20080219141242weblink">weblink 19 February 2008, for a diocese. He has special faculties and the right of succession.

Auxiliary bishop

The diocesan bishop may request that the Holy See appoint one or more auxiliary bishops to assist him in his duties.WEB, Canon 403 §1,weblink Libreria Editrice Vaticana, 1983 Canon law (Catholic Church), Code of Canon Law, 27 July 2009, dead,weblink" title="web.archive.org/web/20080219141242weblink">weblink 19 February 2008,

Bishop emeritus

When a diocesan bishop or auxiliary bishop retires, the word "emeritus" is added to his former title, i.e., "Archbishop Emeritus of ...", "Bishop Emeritus of ...", or "Auxiliary Bishop Emeritus of ...". Examples of usage are: "The Most Reverend (or Right Reverend) John Jones, Bishop Emeritus of Anytown"; and "His Eminence Cardinal James Smith, Archbishop Emeritus of Anycity". The term "Bishop Emeritus" of a particular see can apply to several people, if the first lives long enough. The sees listed in the 2007 Annuario Pontificio as having more than one bishop emeritus included Zárate-Campana, Villavicencio, Versailles, and Uruguaiana. There were even three Archbishops Emeriti of Taipei. The same suffix was applied to the Bishop of Rome, Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI, on his retirement.

See also

Footnotes

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